Get Your Baby To Sleep Through The Night in 7 Easy Steps

At Westchester Health, maybe the only thing we like better than new babies is helping parents learn how to take of their new babies. They typically come to us with lots of questions, first and foremost being, When will our baby sleep through the night?

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Your Kids and Winter: Best Ways To Stay Safe

The winter months can expose everyone, especially children, to conditions that impact their health and safety. That’s why it’s important to create a plan to keep your child safe, whether they are going out in their stroller, going to school or playing in the snow.

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How Can I Know If My Child Is Experiencing Delayed Puberty?

At Westchester Health, I often have parents bring their son or daughter to see me because they’re concerned that he/she is not developing sexually at the same rate as other adolescents their age. Often, these children will ultimately develop normally but will simply experience the hormonal changes of puberty a little later than their peers. In some cases, however, a child is experiencing delayed puberty.

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4 Best Ways To Introduce New Foods To Infants

Without a doubt, one of the best parts of being a pediatrician is helping parents learn how to take care of a new baby. At Westchester Health, we love it when our parents, especially first-time ones, come to us with questions. Some of the most common ones are: How often should we change the baby’s diaper? What’s the right way to hold her? What do we do when he’s colicky?

We also get a lot of questions about feeding, such as how long to breastfeed, when to introduce solid food, and how to recognize if your baby has a food allergy. Recognizing that these are questions many parents have, we put together this blog as a way to share this information more broadly.

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Maybe It’s Not Winter Blues. Maybe It’s Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)

In the late fall or early winter, do you tend to have low energy, feel depressed a lot of the time, and have trouble sleeping? Do these symptoms get worse as the winter progresses and then go away, or at least get better, in the spring and summer when the days are lighter and longer? If this sounds familiar, you may have seasonal affective disorder, or SAD, a type of depression brought on by changes in the seasons, particularly fall and winter.

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9 Simple Ways To Make Your Health A Priority In The New Year

When asked if they should make their health a priority, most people would say yes. However, not all of us do. Between work, kids, housework, yardwork, carpooling, paying bills, visiting with friends and family, and a host of other tasks, paying attention to our health often gets pushed to the bottom of the list. We know we should eat less red meat and more vegetables, exercise more, get more sleep and drink more water, but we don’t do it. Or don’t do it consistently. However, despite our busy schedules, family obligations and never-ending to-do lists, it is possible to make our health a priority and actually enjoy it.

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What Is Polycystic Ovary Syndrome And What Do I Do If I Have It?

At Westchester Health, some of our female patients come to us complaining of irregular or missed periods, and they want to know if this is a signal of an underlying condition that needs attention. After taking a medical history and performing tests, what we find in many cases is that these patients have polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a hormonal disorder common among women of reproductive age.

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Trying To Get To A Healthy Weight? Here’s Help.

I’m Dr. Meghan Auten, a Family Medicine physician and a member of Westchester Health and Northwell Health Physician Partners. In this blog, I’d like to share information about one of the most common topics in my primary care practice — getting to a healthy weight.

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5 Signs And Symptoms of Kidney Cancer

If you asked most people what are the 10 most common cancers in both men and women, they probably wouldn’t name kidney cancer, also called renal cell carcinoma, as one of them. But it’s true. According to cancer.net, kidney cancer is the sixth most common cancer for men, and the eighth most common cancer for women. In 2019, an estimated 73,820 adults (44,120 men and 29,700 women) in the U.S. will be diagnosed with kidney cancer, resulting in an estimated 14,770 deaths.

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What Is AFib And How Can You Tell If You Have It?

At Westchester Health, many of our patients, especially older ones, have AFib, or atrial fibrillation, a quivering or irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia) that can lead to blood clots, stroke, heart failure and other serious heart-related complications. According to the American Heart Association, at least 2.7 million Americans are living with AFib, which accounts for 15-20% of those who have strokes. Yet, many people are unaware that AFib is a serious condition. To share important information about this serious but treatable condition, we offer this blog and related resources.

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