6 Myths About Acne That Just Aren’t True

Contrary to popular belief, neither fatty foods nor chocolate causes acne. Primarily, hormones (male androgens or related compounds) cause acne, which is why so many young people get pimples during puberty, or for girls, right before their period starts. To debunk these and other acne myths, we recommend this blog by Mason Gomberg, MD, a pediatrician with our Westchester Health Pediatrics group.
Continue reading

10 Tips for Dealing With Your Child’s Acne

At Westchester Health, we pay a good deal of attention to how acne is affecting our patients on the inside. A recent study has shown that even having mild acne can bring on feelings of low self-esteem, depression and suicidal thoughts in adolescents and teenagers. Coming at the same time as puberty only adds to the feelings of uncertainty about body image, self-esteem and other emotional issues that young people experience. To alert parents to the potentially damaging psychological effects of acne, Glenn E. Kaplan, MD, FAAP, a pediatrician with our Westchester Health Pediatrics group, has written an excellent blog.

Continue reading

Acne Doesn’t Have To Ruin Your Life.

Oh dear, puberty! That exciting time when a young person leaves the world of childhood and develops into a young adult. Unavoidably, hormones cause many changes during this period, the most emotionally-laden often being pimples or acne.

Continue reading