Does Your Child Has Type 1 Diabetes? 8 Ways To Know.

If you’re the parent of a child with type 1 diabetes, you know how challenging this disease can be, from giving injections to counting carbohydrates to monitoring blood sugar. At Westchester Health, we have many patients with this condition and are very experienced at helping our parents and young patients (when old enough) adequately manage it. To learn more, read this blog (excerpted version) by Rodd Stein, MD, FAAP, a pediatrician with our Westchester Health Pediatrics group.

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Does A Large Waist Mean You Have A Metabolic Disorder?

Here at Westchester Health, we often get questions from our patients wanting to know the difference between metabolic syndrome, metabolic disorder and metabolic diseases. Since there seems to be some confusion, we thought we’d offer this blog as a way to clarify these conditions that, if left untreated, pose serious risks to your health, particularly diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

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How Diabetes Affects Women

Diabetes can affect anyone, regardless of age, race, gender or lifestyle. It can cause serious health problems, including heart attack or stroke, blindness, problems during pregnancy and kidney failure. Diabetes affects women and men in almost equal numbers. However, diabetes affects women differently than men. More than 13 million women have diabetes, or about one in 10 women aged 20 and older. Women with diabetes have a higher risk for heart disease, a higher risk of blindness and a higher risk for depression.

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How Best To Manage Type 1 Diabetes in Children

Many parents in our practice have a child with type 1 diabetes and they’ve told us that although this chronic disease sometimes seems overwhelming, they’ve been able to manage it by following a structured, regular treatment plan.

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What You Need To Know About Growth Disorders

Hopefully, all children develop “normally” but sometimes, either due to nutrition deficits or genetics, certain children develop growth disorders. The good news: Today there are excellent treatments and therapies to help reverse many growth disorders, such as short stature. Also, in many cases, growth disorders are temporary and a child eventually “catches up” to the heights of family members.

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