Why It’s So Important To Burp Your Newborn

Babies often swallow air when they feed, either from breast or bottle, which hurts their tummies and can make them fussy. This trapped air, or gas, needs to be released, and burping is the best way to help your baby get rid of that gas, writes Lauren Adler, MD, a pediatrician in our Westchester Health Pediatrics group, in a recent blog. By burping your baby frequently during and after each feeding, you can hopefully keep painful gas pains to a minimum.

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Having A Baby Over Age 35 Has Its Own Special Joys and Risks

If you’re 35 or older and expecting a baby, you have many advantages over younger moms, such as being more financially secure and having years of life experiences to draw upon when raising your child. As the average age at marriage rises in the U.S., so does the average age of new mothers. We can attest to that: many of our moms-to-be are in their late 30s and early to mid-40s.

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Is Fruit Juice Good Or Bad For Your Child?

At Westchester Health, we were pleased to learn that the American Academy of Pediatrics recently issued new guidelines limiting the recommended amount of 100% fruit juice that should be given to children AND recommending no fruit juice in a child’s first year of life. In fact, this is what we have been recommending to our patients for years. Why? Because juice offers no nutritional benefits early in life and can actually take the place of what babies need most: breast milk (or formula), protein, fat and minerals like calcium.

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How Much Should You Exercise While Pregnant?

At Westchester Health, here’s what we advise pregnant women who ask us if it’s safe to exercise while they’re expecting: if they were physically active before their pregnancy, they can continue their activity in moderation. We firmly believe that maintaining a regular exercise routine throughout a pregnancy can help both the mom-to-be and her baby stay healthy.

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How Much Weight Should I Gain While I’m Pregnant?

Here at Westchester Health, we get this question a lot from our moms who are expecting. Our answer? Yes, of course, you do need to eat extra calories for your growing baby, but it’s really not necessary to “eat for two.” In actual fact, the average pregnant woman needs only about 300 healthy calories more a day than she did before she was pregnant in order to gain the right amount of weight.

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“Do I Need Glasses?” 10 Ways to Know For Sure.

Ironically, one of the clearest signs that you might need glasses is the inability to read an actual sign. However, there are many other clues that can reveal if your eyesight needs correcting with glasses (or contact lenses). As I frequently tell my patients who aren’t thrilled to be needing glasses, roughly 60% of the world’s population requires vision correction and 80% of all visual impairment can be avoided or corrected.

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8 Ways You Can Help Your Child Stand Up To Bullying

One of the most emotional issues we see at Westchester Health affecting our patients and their parents is bullying. We understand how extremely damaging it is to all involved but luckily, there are things you can do to help your child avoid or prevent bullying. A recent blog by Mason Gomberg, a pediatrician in our Westchester Health Pediatrics group, explains the many ways you can help your child in this area (synopsized below). We recommend that all parents take a read.

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14 Signs That You May Be Gluten Intolerant

Did you know that more than 55 diseases have been linked to gluten, the protein found in wheat, rye and barley? And that up to 15% of the US population is estimated to be gluten intolerant? It is also estimated that 99% of people who have gluten intolerance or celiac disease are never diagnosed. Could you be one of them?

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How To Manage Incontinence Without Surgery

Urinary incontinence (the loss of bladder control) is a common problem for many of my patients, but that doesn’t make it any less embarrassing for them. The severity of it can range from leaking urine when they cough or sneeze to having an urge to urinate that’s so sudden and strong that they often can’t get to a toilet in time. No matter where a person is along the spectrum of urinary incontinence, it’s not a pleasant condition. The good news is that for most people, simple lifestyle changes and/or medical treatment can ease the discomfort of incontinence, or even stop it altogether, without having to resort to surgery.

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