How To Know How Much Sleep Your Child Needs

At Westchester Health, one question we get asked almost more than any other is, “How much sleep does my child need?” Our answer: It depends on the age of your child. Our rule of thumb is that if your child wakes up groggy or is overly sleepy during the day, he/she is not getting enough sleep. To help you know how much is enough, we offer this recent blog by Jacklyn Alfano, MD, FAAP, a pediatrician with our Westchester Health Pediatrics group, in which she includes sleep guidelines grouped by age of the child.

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10 Ways to Help Minimize Morning Sickness

For many of our patients here at Westchester Health, morning sickness should really be called “morning-noon-and-night sickness.” For some pregnant women, the symptoms are worse in the morning and ease up over the course of the day. For others, they last all day long. The intensity of symptoms can also vary from woman to woman. Although morning sickness usually subsides after the first three months of pregnancy, it can be a real hardship for some women. Even a mild case of nausea can wear women down, and constant nausea and vomiting can leave them exhausted and miserable (on top of all the other demands on their body from the pregnancy).

As we tell our expectant mothers-to-be, pregnancy can be really tough but it’s all worth it in the end!

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How Often Should You Get a Colonoscopy?

A colonoscopy is a diagnostic screening exam that a physician, usually a gastroenterologist, uses to look inside your large intestine for colon polyps or possible signs of colorectal cancer.  How often you should be screened depends on the specific test, your age and your risk for colon cancer.

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7 Effective Ways to Manage Spring Allergies

Spring is on its way! While many people look forward to this season of renewal, warm weather and beautiful blossoms, for those with allergies it can be something to dread. At Westchester Health, our patients with eye, nose and respiratory spring allergies usually find themselves symptomatic from late March until late May, although the onset of symptoms could be earlier depending on warm weather trends.

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5 Best Ways To Treat Knee Arthritis Without Surgery

If you’re like a lot of people over age 50, knees that have served you well for years gradually start hurting and swelling. They may start making cracking or popping sounds, and you may even feel a grinding sensation in your knees as you move. Most likely, you’ve developed arthritis of the knee, something we see quite often at Westchester Health.

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How to Know if You Have Glaucoma and What to Do About It

At Westchester Health, we often see older patients who have developed glaucoma, a condition that causes damage to the eye’s optic nerve and unfortunately, may get worse over time. Linked to a buildup of pressure inside the eye, glaucoma tends to be genetic and may not show up until later in life. This increased pressure, called intraocular pressure, can damage the optic nerve. If the damage continues, glaucoma can lead to permanent vision loss.

Without treatment, glaucoma can cause total permanent blindness within a few years. Less common causes include a blunt or chemical injury to your eye, severe eye infection, blocked blood vessels inside the eye and inflammatory conditions. Glaucoma usually affects both eyes, but it may be worse in one than the other.

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6 Crucial Tips For Surviving The Terrible 2s

Has your sweet, adorable child suddenly morphed into an unrecognizable little monster? Instead of wide-eyed smiles and happy giggles, are you now witnessing:

  • screaming
  • temper tantrums
  • kicking and biting
  • grabbing toys
  • fighting with siblings
  • every word is “No”
  • total meltdowns  ???

Welcome to the terrible 2s!

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What The New Peanut Allergy Guidelines Mean For You And Your Child

For many years, expert opinion said that the best way to prevent food allergy, especially an allergy to peanuts, was to not feed that food to a child until age 3. However, a landmark study published in 2015 (the LEAP study) has disputed this long-held belief and instead, demonstrated that children at risk for peanut allergy in fact had a much lower incidence of allergy by age 5 if they were fed peanuts regularly by age 6 months, compared to children who avoided peanuts. James A. Pollowitz, MD, FAAAAI, FACAAI, an allergy, asthma and immunology specialist with our Westchester Health Pediatrics group, explains these dramatic new findings in a recent blog.

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12 Simple Tips to Help Your Child Develop Healthy Self-Esteem

In children, self-esteem is influenced not only by their own internal perceptions and expectations but by how they are thought of and treated by parents, siblings, teachers, coaches and friends. How people value themselves, get along with others, perform at school, achieve at work and relate in marriage all stem from their self-image, and it all begins in childhood. In addition, parents need to be good role models for their children and exhibit good self-esteem themselves because their children will follow their example, good or bad, writes Mason Gomberg, MD, a pediatrician in our Westchester Health Pediatrics group, in a recent blog.

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